A pull handle on a push door


It’s annoying isn’t it.  Really annoying.  Which way that door is going to go.  Pull or push or both?  Who cares, you just need to get through it.  It’s got a handle on it.  Give it a pull.  Dah!  Fooled ya! Idiot! can’t you work a bloody door?!  How many times has this happened to you?  Not something worthy of an international crisis, sure, but add it all up and it counts.  Then add up all the other people that have had the same experience (as well as the irritation, embarrassment and distraction) and time is the thing that costs – and reputation.  Emotion counts.  If it’s a service or website or application, you may give up, or go elsewhere, or try and learn how the thing works – but only if you have no choice.

I’ve experienced very plush offices with just this door problem.  The solution?  Have ‘P-U-S-H’ stencilled on the handle.  This is called designing around a problem, or in medical terms, treating the symptoms rather than the cause.  Of course, people still wander up, alone in thought or busy in conversation, see a handle with their peripheral vision, and still pull it.  Dah!  In business, it’s the kind of issue that people try to measure with ROI.  We’ll show you how much you can save by solving these problems – something which, of course, will cost.  Don’t bother.  Just solve it. In this case, just remove the handle.

Now if you ask those guys in Facilities I bet they’ll tell you how it is.  Oh, we need to leave the handles on in case we need to reverse or reposition the door and the cost of removing the handle…  Oh come on, really?  How often do you need to do that?  You’d be surprised.  I bet I wouldn’t.  We’re always having to make changes to the office.  When did you last reverse the way a door opened?  Ah, I can’t remember but we’re always doing things like that.  Sure.

It’s the same in IT and application development.  It’s not obvious how to do that function – yeah, it’s a training issue.  So, we’ve designed it so badly we have to train people how to use it.  Sometimes it’s more subtle.  I was recently involved in the migration of an application for a FTSE 100 company.  The data had already been well positioned and structured in a data warehouse.  Thankfully, no one was interested in revisiting that and we could focus on the front end.  For once we could start with the user interface rather than the database, the only bit users care about.  So, let’s speak to the users and see what they need.  Well, we took the opportunity to revisit the information architecture (how information is grouped and labelled) as well as integrating the visual design with the rest of the Intranet and with a fully indexed search capability.  Great!  But.  But what?  They still want the ‘field finder’ functionality.  Ugh, really, they can’t find fields??  We don’t want to do that, surely.  Yes but people are asking where it is as they use it extensively in the current interface.  No, let’s not do it, we’re designing a product for them with their steer and our expertise so that finding information should be intuitive.  Out of scope.

We went live and no one’s missed the field finder.  In fact the system has been a huge success, one of the few projects we’ve been excited about putting live because we knew we’d got it right.  We knew that because we’d adopted user-centred design for a user experience that worked.  No, it wasn’t for a high volume retail website, just an internal application – one that is critical for the business – over which the users have no choice.  Afterwards, I said to the project manager that it was well worth all the extra effort and he said, no, it wasn’t extra effort, just a different approach.  Fair comment, this cost no more, we just did things better than we usually do.  Enterprise user experience is taking over the largest of corporates but everyone else it seems is still catching up.

User experience is not difficult, is not adopting “agile”, is not the sum of this or that set of methods but is an approach.  If you engage the user to understand how they work, use your design experience, and test your work then you’re more likely – far more likely – to have a successful project.  If you make people walk in the dark then they’ll ask for a torch.  If you put on the lights, they won’t think about light at all because they can crack on.  Do the work and give people what they want – and not necessarily what they ask for.