The Coming of Enterprise User Experience: Why CTOs and IT Directors Need a UX Strategy


Whilst yesterday’s blog was about governance and getting your website or intranet under control through information architecture, this one takes a look inside the organisation to lift the lid on the pressures on good ol’ internal IT.  UX is barely touching the corporate world with so many producing systems the old-fashioned way and some hoping they’ll solve past failures by running to agile.  And yet very few have devised an enterprise UX strategy.  The world is now awash with UX designers and architects which is great but the focus remains on external websites for customers – and on design.  I’ve previously highlighted the lack of internal focus as pure monopoly – the staff can’t choose – but that’s not entirely true.  After all, staff are consumers too – when we let them have a break anyhow.  People are now seeing good design all around them as consumers.  They are standardising corporate and personal email on one device and stroking their iPads on the train.  All this means that expectations are going up.  The days of IT Directors getting a ribbing in the boardroom about their crap systems are over; they’re now being told to sort it out.  But how?

It’s time to get some focus on this and devise a User Experience Strategy for the enterprise.  All seems a bit grand doesn’t it?  Are we not just talking up UX design here?  Do we not just need to get a few specialists in to sort out the crap apps (crapps?)?  No, this is not the design bit, some direction is required first.

Here’s a paraphrased story…picture IT management in a room having a post-beating meeting about this problem…

What’s the problem?  I don’t get it?  So what is the user experience for one of our members of staff?  Is it another gimmick, should we not just sort out the systems we know have problems and…?  No, take a step back, we need to define what it means to be a user in this organisation.  Okay.  Anyone fancy starting?  Erm, right, so users get the standard stuff as well as stuff according to their role – or department – great, we’ve got that on Active Directory so we can start to profile staff from a technology point of view and hopefully automate the desktop for new starts.  So what actually is the standard?  Ok, everyone gets MS Office and the Intranet and then their specialist apps according to their profile.  Great, so what is the Intranet for, exactly?  It’s a presentation layer over the data warehouse and a comms tool.  Is that it?  Ah yeah, but it’s being reviewed isn’t it?  Gawd knows, supposedly.  You know I think we might need some UX objectives and principles here.   This is a useful brainstorm: we’ll come back to that.  What else should be standard?  What about Single Sign On as people are going crazy about having to log in to everything, never mind the security issue of passwords being written on post-its and stuck on the monitor…. Hmmm yeah, and how is that delivered through mobile devices?  Is it all pushed through Good?  Ah, but that uses the Safari browser on the iPad but didn’t we agree to standardise on Microsoft?  No, we never agreed that.  Well it feels like we have.  Yes, but the new version of product x doesn’t work on MS Internet Explorer so we need to upgrade the browsers.  Oh, we’re still on Windows XP so we can’t go to IE10 until we’ve upgraded Windows across all locations.  Ok maybe we need to change browsers.  But doesn’t some SharePoint functionality stop working if you don’t use IE?  Really?  Ok so maybe multiple browsers is good.  But then half of our specialist web apps have not been tested (let alone designed) on anything but IE.  Right, well that needs to be built into our software procurement process.  Oh, have we got one?  Sniggers.  In fact our website is the only thing that works on Firefox and Safari (although the sandal-wearers at the digital agency forgot to test it in IE and we sell to other large corporates who also standardise on Microsoft for an easy life – and they keep moaning about our website!)  Can I just go back to SharePoint a minute – we haven’t actually decided what we’re going to use it for have we?  Are you joking?  Well we rolled out out-of-the-box team sites to get going.  Which was a mistake.  Don’t start on that.  I’ll have to tidy up the mess, thanks!  Too much devolution!  Anyway, we need to migrate our Intranet onto SharePoint at some point.  Why?  It makes things simpler and will integrate with everyone’s presence and profiles and so on.  True.  Has anyone thought about the enterprise information architecture?  Ugh, not now, stick to the apps.  Response times aren’t great in AsiaPac are they?  I wish we’d clouded it.   Oh by the way, does anyone know how users will log into our cloud apps?  Hmmm, I think we’ll need to workshop this whole thing some other time, so who fancies a coffee?

What a headache and that’s why IT Directors get paid so well!  It’s something akin to stripping the engine whilst going round the track.  And it all got a bit teccy didn’t it?  But the challenge is not for UX designers but instead for strategists and technicians: it needs to be both strategic and technically validated so that the user experience is both defined at a high level and then proven technically.  A number of people need to be involved but it must always be strategic and for the long game.  It might help to engage some friendly tech-savvy users in that workshop as well.  In fact, set up a working group because it needs user validation as well as technical validation.  Obvious really.

And lastly, let us not forget what seems like a simple choice for our IT leader to make (keep your head down and hope it will blow away vs sort it out) is more complicated because of all the moving parts at different stages of maturity and focus.  It all comes down to projects and budgets but if you can lay down a strategy then you can start to prioritise and come up with a programme of work that becomes more realistic and communicable.  It’s the user journey for IT.

Getting Your Website or Intranet Under Control: the Power of Information Architecture


This blog looks at how to direct and control your web application, be it a website or Intranet.  What is often forgotten is that information architecture is fundamental to what a web application is and does: it defines its scope.  A good information architecture meets both business and user objectives by means of a user experience strategy.

Previously, I gave a general introduction to information architecture and I referred to a supermarket website and how you might group things together and label them in a way that users understand.  This is generally a good idea, as long as it’s aligned with business objectives: we have to be realistic here.  Sometimes it’s for the public’s own good because, as i guessed in my last blog, some people (65% according to this BBC article – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-23367268) will just think of meat as meat, cooked or uncooked, and be happy to put them together in a bag and probably on a user-defined supermarket shelf – something of a hygiene factor!  And, as I also said previously, customers (especially parents) would be unlikely to group sweets next to the checkout in a physical supermarket architecture!

So, what is all this about?  Governance.  Like it or not, things need a bit of control but where that control comes from and how it is managed is the subtle part.  It’s an issue both for websites and intranets.  Websites are at risk of being driven by the whims of the Sales & Marketing seniors or, even worse, by the whims of an agency they hire.  Engaging users in card sorting exercises helps to design a structure that makes sense.  Similarly you can validate a site structure – or changes/additions to that structure – with a tree test.  Tree tests are great because it allows the users to truly test the fundamental information structure without being cluttered by the design or layout of your actual site.  This all seems tremendously democratic.  What about those 65% who get things wrong?  Well, the reality is that sometimes the users do get it wrong so in reality you shouldn’t be too literal about all parts of user research such as card sorting and like it or not some stakeholder (steak-holder?) or other will want to find some way of putting certain things in users faces – in a language they may wish to choose.  A compromise is made but objectives for both parties are met as far as possible.

When it comes to intranets then having a good information architecture in place is critical as it provides a validated reason for the structure of the site.  In governance terms it also provides you with good reason not to change it willy-nilly.  One of the greatest problems is that everyone wants a piece of it – “oh could you just add a tab for my product/team on the home page” or whatever.  Sites that give in to those kind of requests become a mess and then become another project, until it becomes a mess again.  In other words, information architecture governance helps you manage change control to ensure that you don’t lose and confuse your users by constantly shifting things around and letting the structure go at the seams.  No one will thank you for letting it go, except the people you bring in to sort it out.

So in summary, a good user experience strategy means good information architecture which in turn means good governance.  In reality, this is the happy compromise between the objectives of the business (that wishes to sell or say things) and those of the users (who wish to find things as easily as possible).  It is critical in not only getting a website or intranet right – but in keeping it right through the process of change control.